American Record Guide Review for Cyprus

Cyprus: Between Greek East and Latin West

“Alexander Lingas is one of today’s leading experts on Byzantine music, but he has also developed a vocal group, the Cappella Romana, that has been building an impressive catalog of recordings ranging through the span of Greek Orthodox music, including contemporaneous practice both abroad and in the USA. The present program is an exploration of inter-cultural liturgical life of which Byzantine music was a part. … Lingas and his 11 singers are perfectly in their element.” —John Barker, American Record Guide

Christmas in July!

Enjoy a 20% Off discount for Section A and B tickets to our Christmas programs when you use the promo code “ChristmasInJuly” before July 31st!

Byzantine Christmas: The Sun of Justice


Cappella’s Associate Music Director John Michael Boyer directs exhilarating Byzantine chants for Christmastide in Greek, Arabic, and English. Featuring Lebanon-born guest soloist, Rev’d Deacon John (Rassem) El Massih, and the release of a new CD of the program.

The 12 Days of Christmas in the East


Music director Alexander Lingas leads Cappella Romana in a program of early and contemporary music from the Greek Orthodox tradition for the 12 Days of Christmas. Medieval Byzantine chant, choral works by Greek-Americans Frank Desby, Tikey Zes, and Peter MIchaelides, and by Michael Adamis and Sir John Tavener. Originally performed in the Twelfth Night Festival at Trinity Church Wall Street, New York.

SEATTLE

Fri 5 Jan, 8:00pm
St. James Cathedral
TICKETS

PORTLAND

Sat 6 Jan, 8:00pm
St. Mary’s Cathedral
TICKETS

From The Desk of Mark Powell

Mark Powell, Executive Director

Dear friend,

Your very own Cappella Romana has had a very good 25th Anniversary year: three European tours (including visits to the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany), a week-long residency at Stanford University in the Bay Area with recording sessions of medieval chant from Hagia Sophia, the Arvo Pärt Festival, and the group’s most ambitious Northwest concert series to date, just to name a few highlights.

A highlight for me this year had to have been during our Arvo Pärt Festival. You may not know that I wrote my master’s thesis many years ago on Pärt’s Kanon Pokajanen, and it was the “Prayer after the Kanon” that still somehow caught me completely off-guard. As Cappella Romana sang the final two “Amens,” it was difficult to imagine in that moment any art more piercing to the heart, more perceptive of the human condition. This unspeakably beautiful music ringing out in the cathedral seemed as if it were only for me.

I’m sure you also could share your own Cappella Romana highlight, whether from a recording or live in concert, and I hope you’ll tell us your stories.

Cappella Romana’s work is not an end in itself, but rather serves a higher purpose: to create beautiful, historically informed, transcendent experiences for you through the music of the Christian East and West. And all of this wouldn’t be possible without your support.

Would you make a new gift to the annual fund by June 30th?

Cappella Romana is reaching more audiences than ever before, providing free access through singing liturgical services, local festivals, radio broadcasts, and other outreach. Your giving now provides the base of support that is critical for taking new risks, making new recordings, and accepting invitations to perform all over the world.

Please make your contribution to our annual fund by June 30th and be part of our next chapter, too.

You can make your gift online or by mailing in the reply card enclosed, or by phone (503-236-8202). Monthly giving is also easy to set up. Thank you.

Yours always,

Mark Powell
Executive Director

P.S. Make a gift today to your Cappella Romana. Please also let us know your favorite memory of Cappella Romana when you make your gift. Thank you for your support.

Make a Gift Today to Cappella Romana’s Annual Fund

Cappella Romana Logo

Dear friend,

Your very own Cappella Romana has had a very good 25th Anniversary year: three European tours (including visits to the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany), a week-long residency at Stanford University in the Bay Area with recording sessions of medieval chant from Hagia Sophia, the Arvo Pärt Festival, and the group’s most ambitious Northwest concert series to date, just to name a few highlights.

A highlight for me this year had to have been during our Arvo Pärt Festival. You may not know that I wrote my master’s thesis many years ago on Pärt’s Kanon Pokajanen, and it was the “Prayer after the Kanon” that still somehow caught me completely off-guard. As Cappella Romana sang the final two “Amens,” it was difficult to imagine in that moment any art more piercing to the heart, more perceptive of the human condition. This unspeakably beautiful music ringing out in the cathedral seemed as if it were only for me.

I’m sure you also could share your own Cappella Romana highlight, whether from a recording or live in concert, and I hope you’ll tell us your stories.

Cappella Romana’s work is not an end in itself, but rather serves a higher purpose: to create beautiful, historically informed, transcendent experiences for you through the music of the Christian East and West. And all of this wouldn’t be possible without your support.

Would you make a new gift to the annual fund by June 30th?

With your giving several years ago, Cappella Romana was able to reach more audiences than ever before, providing free access through singing liturgical services, local festivals, radio broadcasts, and other outreach. Your giving now provides the base of support that is critical for taking new risks, making new recordings, and accepting invitations to perform all over the world.

Please make your contribution to our annual fund by June 30th and be part of our next chapter, too.
You can make your gift by going online to cappellaromana.org/give or by mailing in the reply card enclosed, or by phone (503-236-8202). Monthly giving is also easy to set up. Thank you.

Yours always,

       Mark

Mark Powell
Executive Director

P.S. Make a gift today to your Cappella Romana. Please also let us know your favorite memory of Cappella Romana when you make your gift. Thank you for your support.

Spyridon Antonopoulos on Medieval Church Acoustics

Dr. Spyridon Antonopoulos

Dr. Spyridon AntonopoulosThe Red Bull Music Academy features an interview with Cappella Romana’s own Dr. Spyridon Antonopoulos and Emma Warren for an exploration of the transcendent impact and contemporary relevance of medieval acoustics:

“‘Kalophonic music was more embellished and abstract,’ explains Antonopoulos. ‘There are entire compositions of just syllables. It’s an evolution where music seems to usurp text for the first time. To me, that demonstrates humans trying to reach this ineffable place, where speech failed. They had to use music.’ This, he says, is an example of humans trying to unify themselves to the cosmos, when speech is no longer sufficient. It’s what devotional music is all about. ‘This change happens when the massive urban basilicas of Late Antiquity begin to yield to smaller domed churches. Did these spaces respond? Did the music respond? We know there’s a relationship.’”

See the full feature and interview on RedBullMusicAcademy.com

Alexander Lingas on BBC Radio 3

A clip from the BBC Radio 3 program “Private Passions” with celebrated historian Bettany Hughes (author of Istanbul: A Tale of Three Cities), who is a great fan of Alexander Lingas and Cappella Romana. This clip features the ensemble singing the Hymn for Holy Wednesday by Kassia.

Fanfare Magazine Review for Cyprus: Between Greek East and Latin West

Cyprus: Between Greek East and Latin West

New Fanfare Magazine review for our Cyprus: Between Greek East and Latin West recording!

Cyprus: Between Greek East & Latin West

“Musicologist Alexander Lingas continues his mesmerizing exploration of the music of both traditions with a release that offers, as he states in his extensive notes, ‘a sampling of the Byzantine and Latin sacred music that someone could have encountered during the fifteenth century by walking the short distance between the Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic cathedrals of Nicosia.’ Included are traditional chants in Eastern and Western styles, along with music of the more advanced types: isorhythmic motets and kalophonic hymns and kratema (vocalise interludes). … The juxtaposition of these two styles, in a way unique to this time in Cyprus, renders the similarities and divergences in the styles clearer than any dissertation could and makes this a particularly valuable recording for students of this period and region. It goes without saying that the performances of the Portland, Oregon-based professional chorus Cappella Romana are extraordinary. The choir, led by artistic director Lingas, consists of 11 male and female singers, with the robust men’s section taking the Orthodox chant and the women joining in the motets and Latin mass. At least two altos add an upper voice to one of the kalophonic works. As in previous releases in the choir’s now extensive discography, the finest scholarship is aligned with artistry of the highest order. The tone is wonderfully varied and evocative, especially the rich drone of the Orthodox chant. The women’s voices are pure but warm. The unnamed solo cantors are fluent and secure. Any lover of late-medieval music should find this an absolute delight. Add Lingas’s erudite notes, the sizable bibliography, the authoritative editions, and the superb engineering, and this release becomes indispensable.” —Ronald E. Grames, Fanfare

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Help Support a New Arvo Pärt Recording

Composer Arvo Pärt
After multiple performances, and rave reviews of Arvo Pärt’s Odes of Repentance, Cappella is preparing to make a recording of this work — but in order to make it a reality, we’ll need your support!

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SunBreak Review of Venice in the North

Venice in the North

“Russian music for most of us tends to be romantic, often orchestral, always rich; or else, as sung by Cappella Romana, chant sung in distinctive style, often monophonic, serious church music. Last Friday night’s concert at St. Mark’s Cathedral was a complete change from what we have come to expect from this group. … Baroque in style, cheerful, upbeat music in beautiful polyphony filled the cathedral. Thirteen singers plus conductor/tenor Alexander Lingas brought their trademark purity of sound, no vibrato, to the performance. … These pieces were rhythmically steady, usually in a beat of four, and only rarely a run, a group of eighth notes, a dotted rhythm or a word emphasized in a melismatic phrase, yet they were anything but dull. … It was originally performed at the Utrecht Early Music Festival in the Netherlands last year, one of two the group was asked to perform with the theme of “La Serenissima: Venice.” Cappella Romana will perform the second one here at the end of next year’s concert series and if it is anything like this first one, something not to miss for the sheer beauty of it.” —Philippa Kiraly, The SunBreak

Read the full review on TheSunBreak.com